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Muud Concrete Design takes waterscapes to new heights with Rapid Set

Despite the hardships of building concrete vertically without conventional formwork, Adrian Gascon and Neil Hughes of Muud Concrete Design, Los Angeles, Calif., are able to produce pieces with the use of fast-setting cement mix Rapid Set by CTS Cement.

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Natural-stone look comes to precast sports stadiums

The co-winners of the 2011 Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute’s (PCI) Design Awards for the Stadiums/Arenas/Sports Facilities category showcase how skilled, creative precasting crews can mimic natural stone. Both projects, Target Field (home of the Minnesota Twins) and the Indiana University Stadium's north end zone addition, demonstrate stone-like effects by use of form liners or by actually casting in odd-size limestone blocks.

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Silicon Valley sprouts a green gateway

As part of the shift from a transit-oriented location into a vibrant entrance to downtown Palo Alto, Calif., 102 University is a mixed-use building with a concrete façade that was made possible using an innovative concrete mix containing Xypex Admix. The building is currently under design review for LEED-NC Platinum Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

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Sculptor uses Sakrete to bring life to new design

At World of Concrete 2012 in Las Vegas, renowned American sculptor David Seils created a relief sculpture using Sakrete bagged mortar mix and a mason’s hawk and trowel. The landscape design featured the arresting bristlecone pine tree—the world’s oldest tree, reaching 5,000 years of age—which is a threatened species native to desert mountains in the southwestern United States.

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New book remembers original housing bubble, using concrete

The recently published No Nails, No Lumber: The Bubble Houses of Wallace Neff profiles the work of a concrete purveyor who developed permanent Airform-constructed buildings. Better known for his elegant Spanish Colonial-revival estates in Southern California, Neff had a passion for his dome-shaped “bubble houses” made of reinforced concrete cast over a rubber-coated fabric balloon.

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