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Environmental Specialist Rebrands Nycon, Unveils ÀgreenÌ Fiber

After closing on Rhode Island synthetic concrete-reinforcing fiber manufacturer Nycon Inc., Pure Earth has effected a name change to New Nycon Inc., and introduced an eco-friendly fiber derived from new commercial scrap carpet through a proprietary extraction process

Source: Pure Earth, Inc., Trevose, Pa.
After closing on Rhode Island synthetic concrete-reinforcing fiber manufacturer Nycon Inc., Pure Earth has effected a name change to New Nycon Inc., and introduced an eco-friendly fiber derived from new commercial scrap carpet through a proprietary extraction process. Available in nylon and polypropylene blends, Nycon-G fibers increase the value of fibrous concrete in green building, Pure Earth officials contend, as they extend the useful life of post-consumer carpet; utilize a readily available waste, saving water and reducing production emissions; are more cost-effective than traditional synthetic reinforcing fibers; and, augment rating points toward a building's LEED certification.

"Pure Earth enables [us] to immediately begin the expansion of our facilities to handle the expected increases in order flow," says New Nycon President Bob Cruso, who continues in his long-time capacity from the original franchise. "Nycon-G is the only concrete reinforcing fiber on the market that has no negative impact on the environment." The product is the signature offering of the company's nylon, polypropylene, AR glass, steel, micro, macro, PVA and blended fibers, he adds.

Pure Earth CEO Mark Alsentzer notes that New Nycon extends his company's efforts to manage a variety of waste streams into eco-friendly products. Publicly traded Pure Earth is among a handful of companies devoting extensive research to green-building techniques. Its business is split among multiple services: transportation and disposal; engineering; brownfield development; material supply (including crushed stone and recycled concrete operations in New Jersey); disposal and beneficial reuse; and, residual waste management. Current developments include a waste-derived fuel that can be used to power cement kilns.