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Brick Group Joins Coalition Requesting Court To Stay Epa Greenhouse Gas Rule

NAM has submitted to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia a motion for partial stay of the Environmental Protection Agency's greenhouse gas regulations, thereby aiming to exempt stationary-source emissions from Clean Air Act mandates

Source: National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), Washington, D.C.

NAM has submitted to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia a motion for partial stay of the Environmental Protection Agency's greenhouse gas regulations, thereby aiming to exempt stationary-source emissions from Clean Air Act mandates. Joining NAM in the petition--not intended to affect emissions regulations applicable to cars and light-duty trucks--are the Brick Industry Association, American Iron & Steel Institute, National Association of Home Builders and integrated rebar manufacturer and fabricator Gerdau Ameristeel U.S.

Regulations could trigger new permitting requirements on more than 6 million stationary sources, EPA notes, at a cost of at least $78 billion annually. If the EPA begins regulating stationary sources, it will open the door for the Agency to regulate everything from industrial facilities to farms to even American homes, said NAM President John Engler. Such a move would complicate a permitting process the EPA is not equipped to handle, while increasing costs to the manufacturing sector. Further, the EPA has not done any required analysis of the impact of these rules, and its actions will harm our economic recovery [as] our nation continues to face an unemployment rate of 9.6 percent.

In its zeal to control greenhouse gas emissions from stationary sources, the EPA has ignored the impacts on the economy, adds NAM Deputy General Counsel Quentin Riegel. The uncertainty surrounding EPA's regulations will discourage capital investment and, by EPA's own admission, threaten a regulatory construction freeze in some states. The bottom line is jobs will be lost.