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TRB: Albedo change study quantifies role in climate change; PCC overlays perform

The 97th annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board in January drew 13,000-plus transportation engineers and specialists from across the country, and around the world to Washington, D.C. More than 5,000 presentations in over 800 sessions addressed topics in multimodal transportation, including materials and design involving ready mixed concrete and precast/prestressed products. Concrete Products was there and this month presents a report on new research findings in cast-in-place concrete. We’ll look at precast/prestressed related research from TRB 2018 in an upcoming issue. For more information, visit www.trb.org.

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Uniform particle size coal ash: Essential for future concrete applications

The decline in coal for energy has reduced available fly ash supply to the concrete industry and generated a significant increase in finished product variability, which has led to a sharp rise in material costs for high profile projects such as One World Trade Center, New York City.

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ABCs of TRB: Accelerated Bridge Construction ideal for precast/prestressed

Technical papers involving accelerated bridge construction and precast/prestressed concrete products were among the 5,000-plus presentations in more than 800 sessions at the 96th annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board. More than 13,000 transportation engineers and specialists from across the country—and around the world—journeyed to Washington, D.C., earlier this year for TRB 2017, and Concrete Products was among them.

Read more: ABCs of TRB: Accelerated Bridge Construction ideal for precast/prestressed

Scientists link ‘programmable’ cement particles to improved concrete performance

From Rice University, Houston … Bringing order to disorder is key to making stronger and greener cement and concrete. In National Science Foundation and U.S. Department of Energy-backed research, Rice University scientists have decoded the kinetic properties of cement and developed a way to “program” the microscopic, semicrystalline particles within. The process turns particles from disordered clumps into regimented cubes, or spheres that combine to make the material less porous and more durable.

Read more: Scientists link ‘programmable’ cement particles to improved concrete performance